This is How I Left Behind My Previous Life At 14 And Grew to become A Teenage Travel Blogger

On June 13 last summer, I was on my way to receive my high school diploma as part of the 2019 graduation program in my hometown of San Diego, surrounded by friends, close friends and relatives.

But I didn’t. Instead, I woke up in the beautiful ski town of Girdwood, Alaska, in a 30-foot remodel RV that I had been in for the past four years. I was not surrounded by hundreds of people, only six of them most important in my life – my two parents and four siblings.

Although I didn’t finish high school in June, I already had a profitable online blog and an introduction with my boyfriend, my mom. I can’t say I’ve graduated from high school above my class or been admitted to Yale, Harvard or Stanford. All I can say is that by the time my friends graduated, I had created a business that I love with all my heart, which gives me money and the opportunity to find sponsors, which allows me to live every day and explore new experiences around the country and my family.

Throughout the period of change, my path has strayed too far from the 18-year-old, and it all started with a hammer decision about five years ago.

Aside from being educated at home for the rest of my life, I had a normal childhood. My parents had either achieved the “dream” or instead were part of a “rat race.” We had a big house with a pool in the backyard and my parents had a well-trained gym in San Diego. I was an athlete, and I played soccer.

I was an overweight teenager, but I had no interest in becoming a professional entrepreneur. I had the skills in the only way you can afford to get in. It was in this book. But my life changed when I was 13, and my parents decided to move to a coastal town to live near the business. This has put me on the path to my destination.

Although I didn’t finish high school in June, I already had a profitable online blog and an introduction with my boyfriend, my mom.

When I was 14 years old and riding my bike to go swimming every morning, my parents asked me and my siblings what we were thinking about moving to our RV so we could travel more this summer.

Some children may reject the idea because you can only sit on 200 legs with your whole family for three months. My mother’s dream was to travel with her five children – then, 4, 6, 11, 14 and 16 – before we grew up. We all enthusiastically agreed and none of us backed down. We sold almost everything we had (boardboards, mountain bikes and climbing equipment except), followed what we did, and started driving in our RV.

If you were to tell me that I would be the next four years of my life – the years my friends went to high school – and travel around the world when I became a blogger, there is no way I could trust you. I just sit there, settling for a summer game ahead.

The first road trip we took was in Colorado and the second one we took ashore to the island of Vancouver, Canada. On both occasions, we walked a lot and lived outdoors. We could not go any further for a day or two in each town and every place we went was around the climb we wanted, the high ground we wanted to explore or the beach we wanted to filter. Some nights are spent entirely in camps and some nights in National Forest camps or on the street.


Courtesy of Gabi Robledo

Writer (bottom right) and his family in San Diego.

After the first summer, everyone was happier than before so we wondered, “Why?” What started as a five-month flight to the rat race was a nearly five-year (and counting) round trip in 26 different countries with six well-known people I know, my family. Obviously, there were times when some of us were tired of the lack of quiet space and were annoyed with our little clothes. Don’t even bother with me for sharing a small room with six other people. But all of this taught us the importance of communication and respect for the opinions of others.

Most teenagers care about friendships and socializing, and I was no different. Being anonymous, I learned a lot about self-esteem, self-love and having your own personality which gave me the confidence to follow my passions instead of looking for friends and following the crowd.

I didn’t start my blogging career until I was 15 and we started the journey to a six-month camp. We slept in a tent in Norway, Germany, and Ireland for two months before climbing the 22nd floor, which we traveled to other parts of western Europe. My mom wanted to start sharing tips and inspiration from our travels so she started a blog and we named it Move With Purpose.

Camp writer at Les Contamines, France.


Courtesy of Gabi Robledo

Camp writer at Les Contamines, France.

Before we moved, my siblings and I had moved home and since I was one year younger than my older brother, it was easy for my mother to teach us the same lessons as we did. We didn’t go to summer school – by age 15, I had finished pre-calculus – so we didn’t worry about education during our trip to Europe.

Somewhere over the course of six months, something changed in me – well, I was just disgusted. My mother was doing a lot of research by starting a blog and she talked to me about any job opportunities. As the journeys continued to develop in my mind, I began to feel distant from my peers and I no longer felt like going to high school. I was curious about alternatives to the life I expected in high school, college and then working for someone else.

This summer of 2016, my mother and I started fortunately blogging about travel and foreign travel but we didn’t really think about where we wanted to go with this project. We had no idea what kind of product we were trying to create, the importance of SEO (optimization of search engines), the critical importance of the social media system, the amount of time we needed or the vision we needed. Until January 2018 when my mother and I took a closer look at what we have done so far and realized that we need to do more.

I was very different from my peers. It was difficult for me to develop close friendships with friends from the village when our lives were so different and I often stayed out for a few months.

I was 17 when I first became a deep blogger. It was also when family and friends often asked me, “So you’re going to college?” And let me tell you the truth: I don’t really think about college. Instead, I focus on creating our own blog and making money. No one seemed to trust me or take me seriously, and many of my relatives thought I was not dreaming and making money on the blog.

By volunteering to run my business at that age, I started to feel out of place with my peers. It was hard for me to have such a close relationship with my friends from the village when our lives were so different and I often stayed away for a few months, but most of them didn’t seem to believe in my dreams. Instead, most of my friends seem to be angry with me – perhaps because if I win, they think it wouldn’t be fair. Injustice why can’t he have what I had. The truth is that they can. We all have a choice, and when a lot of people believe that I can’t do it, I want to do better.

While my friends were studying history and biology, I was studying history in the palaces of Germany and England, picking up languages ​​in an attempt to order bread every morning in France, and meeting cultures in a village in Indonesia where prayers are heard. clock This type of education is very valuable.

Obviously, part of me feels like I’m just missing out on what it’s like to be an American teenager. Of course, I never went to visit home with proms and parties, but everything in life is a choice and the good things about visiting me outweighed the convenience of living in a nice urban house.

Of course, I never went to visit home with proms and parties, but everything in life is a choice and the good things about visiting me outweighed the convenience of living in a nice urban house.

While our family experiences can be fun, there were often times of growth and hardship, too. There were days when I just wanted to stop blogging. Days when none of my work seemed to be appreciated. But I refused.

Today, my mom and I have about 30,000 people who come to our site every month, and we earn a lot of money through advertising, affiliate marketing and sponsorship. We continue to travel several successful trips to the US and other countries but sometimes we stay at our favorite RV locations in San Diego where we can swim every morning and ride to our gym.

By the end of this year, one of my sisters had started working as a support for our blog and even started writing a few essays. While I don’t think she wants to be a talented blogger, the digital skills she is learning will definitely help in her quest to become a freelancer. My older brother, on the other hand, is the only brother who dreams of “stability”. He is a fictional writer and has already written three books, but in his current career, he studies with my father as a private tutor in San Diego.

In the meantime, I have big plans where I want to see the name Nomads With A Purpose go.

My mother taught me that I should not follow what I wrote. I can do something for myself if I work hard and want it right. I am happy to say that my dream is coming true.

You can choose to thank me for my success because of my upbringing and my life of living a nomadic life. She is lucky. He has a head. He did it with his mother. They have time because they don’t go to school. The truth is, these were all excuses but not the whole story. My mother taught me that I should not follow what I wrote. I can do something for myself if I work hard and want it right. I am happy to say that my dream is coming true.

Am I ready to “get out of the nest,” if you do? Unlike 18-year-olds who want to disrupt family life, I prefer to jump off the train. My high school credentials are still in the air, as my education was obtained outside of school. And for now, I’m fine with that. Next year, I will have my own travels and the whole family going to places like Austria and Patagonia.

The blog that my mother and I built together is more than just a good business. We called ourselves the One Who is the Purpose for a reason. We want to encourage others to pursue their dreams and live meaningful lives.

Therefore, to those who dream and do something, here is my advice: Yes, people will judge you. All love, fear and jealousy will come out of a close relationship with you. There will be enemies and there will be people who will be encouraged by you. Most importantly, nothing is needed. No one idea or idea of ​​you can change your mind to follow your preferences.

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