Brooklyn Botanic Backyard Turns Over a New Leaf

Only the orthopedists at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden were the first to witness the blossoming of the cherry blossom and the cool breeze during the closing ceremony. The immature wisteria flowers fell on the flowers of the flower garden of the flower garden flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flower flowers flower flower flower

The garden was reopened in August for a few visitors who live far away every day. Now, with a clear view of the fall, the gardens and forests that were completed in late summer are finally coming on their own. It is a testament to the transformation that has taken place over the years, as the garden changes new page with the appointment of September Adrian Benepe, former head of the New York City department of Parks and Recreation, as the new president and senior.

Bottle gardens have long been a symbol of development, cutting and distribution. The Botanic Garden in Brooklyn has not lost its collection of beautiful flowers or flowers but has brought many ecosystems to 52 acres. These new groups are harmless, infested with insects and birds, and are constantly evolving with flowers, seeds, and evergreen varieties.

The 1.25-acre slope has been Robert W. Wilson Neglected. Now it has a removable path connected to the white concrete walls. It is a curve in a thick swamp that looks like calligraphic stripes.

The remains are based on the excavations of the nearby Brooklyn Museum in the early 20th century. Two mirrors forming the entrance to Washington Avenue and the guest house were introduced in 2012, by architects Marion Weiss and Michael Manfredi. By drawing this amazing design, the craftsmen fixed it on a grass roof in the courtyards across the garden. The view connects the high attractions that surround the museum with the field section facing south.

The system also facilitates a three-story slope for disabled visitors with a very narrow fence so that no barricades are needed. The 680-foot tall snake encourages deep meditation when it climbs a little over 26 feet. “The field is delayed,” Weiss said.

Colors and dyes are carefully cultivated in this forest. “Grass is a common sight,” explained Tobias Wolf, a sculptor. Small intertwined flowers, leaves and stems embrace the soil, as well as wild strawberries that run high above the storage walls. The Wolf likened the idea of ​​sowing to “fine yarn,” creating, in a sense, a small, natural environment. “Even in winter there is a network of interlocking plants that start with the seeds,” he said.

Acne mainly affects one another, such as pomegranates from the lower planting season, with their hot summer days gone and their leaves turned rusty. Forgetting adds 12 new colors to its small group. They have gained popularity because climate change has spread to their north.

The Botanic Garden was opened in 1911 as a plant donation that was collected for appreciation and scientific research, and new species of myrtle will continue the work. At the same time, he paints a place to rest on the way to famous landmarks such as the Cherry Esplanade and Cranford Rose Garden: sticky fragments scattered below that resemble the beauty of the Beaux-Arts at the Brooklyn Museum, now lined with forests, vegetation mixed in various forms.

Nowhere does this look better than the Elizabeth Scholtz Woodland Garden, which saves a well-maintained corner of the Botanic Garden and transforms it into a vast forest to the northeast.

Using a series of twists and turns from Brooklyn Bridge Park and its well-known works, architect Michael Van Valkenburgh designed a variety of shade trees. His ideas are strange but strange, because planting, such as by observation, mixing natives with what is cultivated. Beautiful Asian conifers spread their green branches near the sturdy young American trees. The halls are solid and the venue is very close, opening for short vistas, including a museum dome.

In the past, flower gardens have been set up to “move from one table to another,” says Van Valkenburgh. “What we’re doing is like renovating a museum,” we are beautifying exhibitions and demolishing boundaries between them. “We’re seeing the concept of a forgiving garden,” he added. “You can find what they are talking about.”

What initially looked like a roofless area visible through lindens is a walled courtyard that Mr. Van Valkenburgh did. “It’s a loving idea,” he said. “We want to surprise you.” Roads run around the delicate branches of the magnolia tree called Green Shadow. His hand is visible as far as the south gate on Flatbush Avenue. Using the burning techniques they attract visitors to surround the large trees of the Native Flora Garden, as well as showcases maps from Japan and China that emerge from small plantations. The small trees that turn yellow look backwards where the trees are.

In the past, Van Valkenburgh built Belle’s Brook, a stream that flows through a Japanese garden pool and runs west of the park’s grassland. The turmoil in the color of the leaves and the beauty of its water-loving plants contrast with the fine movement of the exotic trees on the east side – the diversity of natural beauty of plants and the creation of but real nature. “Although the river looks natural and native there are plants from all over the world,” he said. “They can be French, North American or Japanese but they can play together.”

The river extends to Shelby White and Leon Levy Water Garden, the original location of Discovery Garden and Children’s Garden near the south entrance. The water farm project also includes a filter system that returns the river water to Japan’s pools, saving millions of fresh water each year.

Woodland Garden is finalizing a $ 124 million plan made in 2000 by former Botanic Garden President Judith Zuk and its former chairman, Earl Weiner, and was brutally assassinated by Scot Medbury, who left in January. He replaced Mr. Benepe, who recently came from the Trust for Public Land.

“My first goal is to make it happen,” he said. Benepe said as he walked through the garden. He is looking at how the agency can help us as coronaviruses have made gardens and parks “more important than ever for their health and mental well-being.” Globally, he said, parks face financial challenges.

The Botanic Garden’s long-running programs continue through video; sends the seeds to the children to grow on their own. Mr Benepe now welcomes students to the small-scale field. “Science tells us that the outside is safer than indoors,” he said. Schools and the state government did not participate in the process, so it is up to the parents to bring them here to see and touch the magic.

Brooklyn Botanic Garden

990 Washington Avenue, Brooklyn; 718-623-7200, bbg.org. Admission tickets are required to enter.

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